Scholar, Scientist, Physician, Public Servant

Margaret A. Hamburg is a graduate of Radcliff College and received a medical degree from Harvard Medical School. Her research was in neuroscience at Rockefeller University in New York, and she studied neuropharmacology at the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

Dr. Hamburg was raised by prominent physicians. Her friends were related to the medical profession. Her expertise is in community health. She is also an expert in a field not usually associated with the medical profession in the areas of biodefense, and preparedness for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats.

Because of Dr. Hamburg’s expertise in appreciating the danger of these threats, she supported a foundation devoted to public safety, the Nuclear Threat Initiative, which appointed her as the vice president for biological programs.

Dr. Hamburg has focused on AIDS research, serving as the assistant director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), from 1989 to 1990. Further, she has been associated with the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

From 1991 to 1997, Dr. Hamburg served as health commissioner for New York City. She developed cutting-edge programs for containing the proliferation of tuberculosis and AIDS. The TB rate fell by 86 percent for the most resistant strains.

In 1997, she was appointed by President Clinton to be assistant secretary for policy and evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In 2009, President Obama appointed Dr. Hamburg as the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Dr. Hamburg is a member of the board of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. She has been heralded to have a wealth of experience in science, health care, and regulatory affairs.

The Parker Institute has forged a collaborative relationship with outstanding scientists, clinicians, and industry. The Parker Institute coordinates the cancer immunotherapy research effort. Its primary goal is the advancement of the understanding of immune therapies capable of curing cancer.

As a board member of the Parker Institute, Dr. Hamburg, in 2015, was appointed the foreign secretary of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Dr. Margaret Hamburg has now been named as the president-elect for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Her term will begin in February 2017.

On top of all this dedication to public service, Margaret Hamburg’s most precious accomplishment is a mother of two children, while she gave birth while employed as New York City Health Commissioner.